Tag Archives: Kati Ran

2020m05 – Myrkur – Harpes Kraft

Myrkur - Folkesange (2020)

The Power of the Harp

New month, new monthly marker!

Many songs tell us about the magical beauty of harp play and the powers a skilled player can wield under the right circumstances. Previously I was captured myself by Kati Rán‘s Harpa Toner which upon investigation turned out to be one of many renditions of the same tale that has been traveling throughout Europe, shapeshifting and scope-creeping, evolving in time to well-known versions like Binnorie, The Twa Sisters, The Bonnie Swans and Harp of Death. Now, once more I am mesmerized by a harp-related song (or should I say ‘sange’? ) and this time as well, I simply had to know what was behind the softly sang lyrics brought across by the tempting voice of none other than Amalie Bruun, a.k.a Myrkur.

Though mostly known for her Metal albums, Amalie has been diving deeper and deeper into the richness of Scandinavian traditional songs and clearly she came up with some pure Danish gold. As early as January of 2018, some of you may have been lucky enough to witness performances of Myrkur having struck new ground, touring together with other great artists of our scene, like Christopher Juul ( Heilung, Euzen ) and… you guessed it: Kati Rán. Fortunately her collaboration with Christopher did not end when the tour did. In fact, she stepped into his famous Lava Studios and recently proudly released her latest album Folkesange.

This work of art is a 100% match with our station’s format, which means we will be able to play each individual track and what’s more: we have chosen Harpens Kraft as our new Monthly Marker, meaning we will be playing it 5 to 6 times a day for the month of May!



And this brings me back to the story: Harpens Kraft dates as far back as (at least) 1570 and is a ballade about Villemann and Magnhild. Whilst playing a game, the bride is clearly distraught and Villemann inquires about the reasons for her distress, offering up several possibilities, which all are refuted by Magnhild. Instead, she reveals a premonition that she will fall (to her death) into the river Blide, like her two sisters did before her. Although the lyrics of Harpens Kraft end here, the story does not. Despite Villemann’s reassurances promising her the protection of many of his men and the building of a very strong stone bridge, she is not comforted and as it turns out, rightfully so. When Magnhild crosses the bridge, her horse rears up on its hind legs and she falls off into the river. The moment Villemann hears of this, is where Myrkur picks up lamenting in the song Villemann og Magnhild, the Norwegian part of this tale, which is also part of the repertoire of bands like (amongst others) SKÁLD and Datura:



After her fierce Kulning singing, Amalie continues to tell how Villemann took his golden harp to enchant the troll that was holding Magnhild, by draining the power from his arm with his harp play. As is often the case with Nordic tales, the (here unsung) ending isn’t a happy one, as she doesn’t come back to life, but he can at least provide a proper burial.

Epilogue:
The story of this tale actually doesn’t end here and so, I will finish with the beginning. In the variations that could be heard in Denmark, Sweden and Norway, the troll was the villain, yet in Iceland, there was none but fate itself. Something happened halfway on the Norwegian Sea and clues can be found exactly there: on the Shetland Islands, wherein Unst the Scandinavian versions were predated by a very similar song from the 14th century:



This song has a happier ending, the Celtic influences are clearly recognizable in the character of the Elven King and the clue to the last part of this trip, lies in the naming of the hero of it all: Villemann is called King (or Sir) Orfeo. This is where my wonderings went full circle for me: Orfeo was one of the first Balfolk bands I danced to, back when the scene was just sprouting in the Netherlands and it was the personal CD collection of Erica, the flutist of that very band, that laid the foundation for CeltCast’s musical arsenal not much later.

But wait! There’s even more to this story:
Let me offer you the chance to go even further back in time and have a listen to AmmA‘s King Orfeo, a rendition of the late 13th century version of the Westminster-Middlesex area. This version was introduced via Breton poets in Medieval times and it contains a mixture of Celtic mythology, such as the faeries, the Greek myth of Orpheus.



Yes, you read that correctly: this tale brings you all the way back to Greek mythology when in 438 B.C. Euripides wrote the first known version of this love story of Orpheus and Eurydice in his Alcestis. And that to me is the true power of the harp: this instrument once again welcomed me to travel far beyond the confinement of my home and through 25 centuries to show how we are all connected, supported by the tales that travel through time, preferably put to beautiful music.

– Alex


Hello music lovers!

Also this week, a lot of hard work has been put into setting up the new radio server. And, we have a theme this Monday, namely: “Close to the CeltCast home” ! 17 albums that were created in the Netherlands and by our neighbours from Belgium.

They are all beautiful albums with their own style! The Ambrozijn album (Wim Claeys, Wouter Vandenabeele) dates from 1998 and contains very original songs. I love it! 🎼

The two albums of Rapalje Celtic Folk Music were bought a long time ago in a beautiful wooden box with lovely detailed booklets in it.

For our balfolk fans we have a number of very danceable albums, such as those from Itchy Fingers , Snaarmaarwaar , EmBRUN , , Tweedledum & Tweedledee , Le Vélo Vert and Ambrozijn.

We bought the album of Snaarmaarwaar (together with two others) at a very special festival in Belgium: Celtic Night Geluwe . We still miss that wonderful event. Ann and Marc created this festival every year with heart and soul!

The Harmony Glen “Live in Bremen” album is a recording of a concert in Germany. It is a party to listen to this. Jump, jump!

Two albums of Tjarda , “Fairytale Folk” is one of my favourites! Tjarda has a beautiful voice and the harp she plays, gives a nice “fairy” atmosphere. 🧚‍♀️

And, to stay in the mood of the Fairy tales … the album of Elvya Dulcimer “Untold Stories”, where the front of the album perfectly reflects the atmosphere of the narrative (dulcimer) music.

This week again an album of OMNIA, LEAF ( Kati Rán , Tho Mas , Marijn Sies , Fieke van den Hurk and Chloé Bakker ) and SeeD Pagan Folk , which are, in their own way, very special to our scene.

Are you familiar with these albums? Tell us about your favourites!

Very happy that these beautiful CD’s have been processed:

The Netherlands:
Itchy Fingers – Itchy Fingers (2014)
Tjarda – Fairytale Folk (2016)
Tjarda – Wolf Child (2015)
SeeD Pagan Folk – Ling (EP) (2014)
Rapalje Celtic Folk Music – Into Folk (1998)
Rapalje – Alesia (2001)
Harmony Glen – Live in Bremen (2016)
L.E.A.F. – Lark, Elk and Fable (2012)
OMNIA – Wolf Love (2010)
– Squirrels Stash (2015)
Tweedledum and Tweedledee – Gyre and Gimble (2015)


Belgium:
Elvya Dulcimer – Untold Stories (2015)
Ambrozijn – Ambrozijn (1998)
Azimut – Onze Demo (2016)
EmBRUN – EmBRUN (2006)
Snaarmaarwaar – Snaarmaarwaar (2013)
Le Vélo Vert – Le Velo Vert (2007)


Musical greetings, Ilona CeltCast

New CD's

CeltCast: Live in the Livingroom with Trolska Polska!



CeltCast: Live in the Livingroom with Trolska Polska !

The links, as promised:
https://rodfolk.dk/2019/ – * ROD *, yearly Danish youth folk music camp
https://imdb.com/title/tt0071448/ – * Dunderklumpen *, Swedish movie about trolls
https://www.facebook.com/TrioSvin/ – * Trio Svin *, Danish speed/metal/rock/rapfolk
http://floatingsofaquartet.com/ – * Floating Sofa Quartet *, Danish/Swedish/Finnish folk music
http://poebel.dk/ – * Pøbel *, Medieval music
http://ralsgardtullberg.blogspot.com/ – * Ralsgård & Tullberg Quartet *, Swedish traditional flute music
https://da.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troldepus – Trollbook
http://www.worldoffroud.com/ – * Brian Froud *, troll artist
https://youtu.be/YCJhZ4poZkQ – * Kati Ran & Helisir * – Vinda


Interview with Kati Ran and Raoul Boesten on the choir Yoik.



Yoik zingt Noorse wind

Tonight we’re glad to witness “Yoik zingt Noordse wind” in the Ichthus Church in The Hague! You can espect some live streams of beautiful traditional Scandinavian songs sung by this choir featuring Kati Ran on our page tonight!

Yoik zingt Noorse wind







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